HyC Adventures
The Poetics of Perception
G.B. Shaw's Play Misalliance

 

 

 

G. B. Shaw’s Play

Misalliance

Santa Fe Community Theatre 1965

 

Hyatt Carter

 

Shortly after I arrived for the first time in Santa Fe as a young lad of 23 back in 1965, I enjoyed the good fortune to be one of the players in a production of G. B. Shaw’s comic masterpiece, Misalliance. I played the role of Joey Percival whose romantic interest in the story was Hypatia, played by Mike (Michaela) Lawrence, and here the two of us are in a picture that appeared on the front page of Pasatiempo, the Sunday Magazine in the local newspaper, the Santa Fe New Mexican . . .

 

 

 

 

The only picture available, unfortunately, is one on microfilm that I found at the New Mexico State Library and the quality, as you can see, is not good.

 

The caption below the picture reads: “Misalliance, a rollicking romantic farce by George Bernard Shaw, will open  the new season for the Santa Fe Community Theatre Friday at the theatre at 142 E. De Vargas St. Rodney Carter,* portraying Joey Percival and Mike Lawrence as Hypatia, are shown in one of the scenes of romantic explosion which appear throughout the play. See picture story on pages 6, 7.”

 

It was great fun from beginning to end and the audience at each performance rewarded us with lots of laughter. Here’s the article about the play, by Ralph Dohme, from the inside pages of Pasatiempo:

 

Misalliance, George Bernard Shaw’s scintillating farce will be presented at the Santa Fe Community Theatre, 142 E. De Vargas, Friday and Saturday evenings at 8:30 inaugurating the 1965-66 season of plays. It will be repeated on December 3 and 4.

 

Written in 1910, Misalliance was unaccountably thought too lacking in action for success, but its 1953 revival in New York proved it to contain as much fast-paced tomfoolery as it has of Shaw’s masterful wit. In the play Shaw clowns with an airplane crash, an intriguing lady acrobat, romantic foot races, and a portable Turkish bath.

 

On a serene Saturday afternoon a host of friends and intriguers invade the household of John Tarleton, a wealthy underwear manufacturer, and his daughter Hypatia. These include Bentley Summerhays, Hypatia’s fiancé, and his father Lord Summerhays who has also proposed to the girl. Then in the plane crash comes Joey Percival, a friend of Bentley’s, whom Hypatia immediately sees as a much better catch for herself. A passenger in the plane is Lina, the lady acrobat, who takes the fancy of Tarleton, his son Johnny, and both Bentley and his father. Finally comes a strange young man with a gun who is bent on shooting Tarleton.

 

When Shaw boils the pot with this collection of characters, he serves up a banquet of continuous merriment.

 

In the Community Theatre’s production, which is under the direction of Mac Mauldin, the leading roles of Tarleton and his daughter Hypatia are played by Robert Garrison and Mike Lawrence. Carolyn Allers is seen as Mrs. Tarleton, William Ford as Lord Summerhays, Roy Stephenson as Bentley, Rodney Carter as Percival, Bob Nugent as Johnny, Dorothy Barron as Lina, and Buzz Grey as the strange young man with the gun.

 

In addition to Misalliance, the group will present A Far Country and Amphitryon 38.

 

Sunday, November 21, 1965

Photo Story by Ralph Dohme

 

 

*In 1965 I was still using the first name I was christened as: Rodney. Soon thereafter, I shortened this to Rod and for the last twenty years or so I have been writing as Hyatt Carter, a change recommended by my literary agent when I was writing screenplays in Los Angeles.

 

I would welcome hearing from any cast members who happen to read this and might want to touch base after all these years. My email address:

 

HyattCarter@aol.com

 

 

 

HyC

 

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